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Marianas Trench coming to Caesars Windsor this fall

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Marianas Trench is bringing The Force of Nature Tour to Caesars Windsor with special guest LØLØ for an all-ages performance this fall.

The bands are booked for Friday, Nov. 29 at 8 p.m.

Since their 2006 debut album, Fix Me, Marianas Trench has consistently raised the musical bar both in the studio and with their explosive live shows around the globe. Amongst their many accomplishments, the Vancouver-based four-piece band composed of Josh Ramsay, Matt Webb, Mike Ayley, and Ian Casselman, has earned two certified Double-Platinum records, one Platinum record, a certified Gold-selling record, and Triple-Platinum digital singles.

They were awarded the 2013 JUNO Award for “Group of the Year” and achieved several chart-topping radio hits including “Stutter,” “Fallout,” and “Who Do You Love.”

The band recently released their new radio single “Lightning and Thunder,” available now via 604 Records/Warner Music Canada and all streaming platforms.

This track follows the band's surprise release of “A Normal Life,” a track about feeling like you don’t belong in your place in life and knowing you were meant for something more. The song was the band's first new studio release since their acclaimed 2019 album, Phantoms. Both new tracks will appear on the band’s forthcoming album, which is slated to be released later this summer.

Tickets go on sale on Friday, May 31 at 10 a.m. Ticket purchases can be made through caesarswindsor.com or ticketmaster.ca. The Box Office is open Friday & Saturday from Noon to 8 p.m. and on Show Days from Noon to 10 p.m.

For more information, visit caesarswindsor.com and stay tuned for further details. Guests must be 19 years of age or older to enter the casino and all other outlets.

Caesars Rewards members can purchase presale tickets, available at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, May 29. To learn more, visit the Caesars Rewards Centre.

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