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The northern lights were visible across Windsor-Essex. Take a look

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The most powerful geomagnetic storm in the past 20 years resulted in some awe-inspiring images captured by people all across Windsor-Essex.

Declared a G4 by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, this particular storm stands as the second-highest level of solar storms, with the last occurrence recorded in 2005, as reported by CTV News Toronto.

Referred to as the "aurora borealis" in the northern hemisphere, the phenomenon of lights dancing in the night sky results from a solar material explosion.

IN PHOTOS: Northern lights in Windsor-Essex

These charged particles collide with Earth's magnetic field and interact with the atmosphere, creating a mesmerizing display of light.

Northern lights typically don't reach latitudes as far south as southern Ontario — which made Friday night and Saturday morning's light show a rare spectacle.

Got a photo you'd like to submit? Please send us an email at newsnow@bellmedia.ca. 

-- With files from CTV News London’s Ashley Hyshka and CTV News Toronto's Hannah Alberga

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