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Don't forget to move over for emergency vehicles

Weekend police blitz to focus on 'move over' law
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Police in Chatham-Kent are reminding the public about the importance of moving over for emergency personnel on the roadway,

"As a responsible community member, it is essential to be aware of and follow the proper protocols when an emergency vehicle is approaching or is already stopped on the side of the road. Here are some tips to keep in mind," said police.

When you see or hear an emergency vehicle approaching with lights and sirens on, quickly move your vehicle to the right side of the road to allow for safe passage. This includes pulling over to the right, even in the left lane.

Failing to pull over for emergency personnel violates the law. The penalties for this offence can be significant and can impact your ability to drive in the future. 

Types of vehicles to move over for

  • police cars
  • firetrucks
  • ambulances
  • tow trucks

 

Penalties

Drivers can be charged if they do not slow down or move over when it is safe to do so. Drivers can face the following penalties:

First offence

  • fines ranging from $400 to $2,000
  • 3 demerit points if convicted
  • possible suspension of driver's licence for up to 2 years

Subsequent offences (within five years)

  • fines ranging from $1,000 to $4,000
  • 3 demerit points if convicted
  • possible jail time of up to 6 months
  • possible suspension of driver's licence for up to 2 years

It is also illegal to follow within 150 metres of a fire vehicle or ambulance responding to a call.

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