Students at the University of Windsor will be able to expand their knowledge of Indigenous literature, history, philosophy, political science and more with the school’s new undergraduate minor in Indigenous Studies program.

The Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (FAHSS) announced the new interdisciplinary minor Tuesday. The program was developed by Indigenous faculty members in FAHSS who are also members of the University of Windsor President’s Indigenous Peoples Scholars.

“We are thrilled to be able to offer our students the ability to expand their knowledge of Indigenous Studies through this timely and important minor program of learning,” Dr. Cheryl Collier, dean of FAHSS said in a news release. “I want to sincerely thank all of the FAHSS Indigenous Scholars as well as the former dean of FAHSS, Dr. Marcello Guarini, for their hard work and determination in creating the minor. We look forward to growing Indigenous Studies into the future.”

FAHSS is the largest faculty at the University of Windsor offering more than 60 undergraduate programs, certificates, and minors through 11 departments and schools, and more than 15 graduate (MA and PhD) programs.

Courses currently offered in the minor program include Indigenous literature (English) Aboriginal history, political science, philosophy, and an introductory “Indigenous Topics” course. A minor consists of six courses. According to the university, there are more courses in the works.

"After taking the course Introduction to Indigenous Topics, my perspective has drastically changed by truly understanding the interconnectedness of Indigenous history and Canada’s history. When learning about Canada, you cannot dismiss the important role that Indigenous peoples had in shaping where we are today. This course opened my eyes to the importance of being educated on this subject and has increased my desire to take more courses in this area,” political science student Simone Gignac said.

The university said it is committed to advancing programs that build stronger and more meaningful partnerships with Indigenous students, scholars, and communities.