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Driver busted going 101km/h in a 50 zone in LaSalle: police

Police say the driver of the Buick Encore was clocked on laser radar in the 2300 block of Front Road in LaSalle, Ont., on Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2024. (Source: LaSalle police) Police say the driver of the Buick Encore was clocked on laser radar in the 2300 block of Front Road in LaSalle, Ont., on Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2024. (Source: LaSalle police)
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A 20-year-old man from Windsor was charged with stunt driving after police say he was going 101 kilometreS per hour in a 50 km/h zone in LaSalle.

Police say the driver of the Buick Encore was clocked on laser radar in the 2300 block of Front Road on Wednesday morning just before 7 a.m.

His licence was immediately suspended for 30 days and his vehicle was towed and impounded for 14 days.

The LaSalle Police Service, along with its counterparts at Windsor Police Service and the Ontario Provincial Police have regularly enforced stunt driving as it relates to speeding and published some of the charges they have laid. Police say some drivers are still not getting the message to slow down.

The purpose of this message serves primarily to educate and remind the public of the dangers of driving at excessive speeds. Secondly, it is to act as a deterrent by explaining that police are regularly and continuously engaging in traffic enforcement which could result in significant fines, the suspension of your licence, and impoundment of your vehicle.

As per Ontario Regulation 455/07 “stunt” includes driving a motor vehicle at a rate of speed that is 40 km/h or more over the speed limit (speeding), if the speed limit is less than 80 kilometres per hour or driving a motor vehicle at a rate of speed that is 50 kilometres per hour or more over the speed limit (speeding), if the speed limit is 80 kilometres per hour or more.

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