Skip to main content

City of Windsor names new infrastructure services commissioner

David Simpson, commissioner of infrastructure services for the City of Windsor. (Source: City of Windsor) David Simpson, commissioner of infrastructure services for the City of Windsor. (Source: City of Windsor)
Share

The City of Windsor has named a new commissioner of infrastructure services.

Starting July 8, David Simpson will take over the roles of city engineer and infrastructure services commissioner from Mark Winterton, who was brought out of retirement in November 2023.

Since 2017, Simpson has served as the director of public works at Oxford County, overseeing the operation and management of more than $3.2 billion worth of municipal infrastructure, according to a statement from the City of Windsor.

Prior to 2017, he worked at Halton Region.

According to Windsor Mayor Drew Dilkens, Simpson's vast experience in the municipal sector and across many intersecting municipal portfolios makes him a welcome addition to the City of Windsor's administrative team.

"As we move forward with initiatives that increase our housing supply, revitalize the core, and invest in the vital new and aging infrastructure required to sustain our growth trajectory, it is important to have the right people at the table," Dilkens added.

Mark Winterton was brought back to the city after Dilkens used strong mayor powers granted to him by the province to remove Chris Nepszy from the role of infrastructure commissioner. 

Following his termination, Nepszy filed a nearly $1.55 million wrongful dismissal lawsuit against the city, alleging a "top-down culture of corruption" at city hall. 

The city has since filed a statement of defence

All the allegations in Nepszy's statement of claim have not been tested in court.

CTVNews.ca Top Stories

Should you wait to buy or sell your home?

The Bank of Canada is expected to announce its key interest rate decision in less than two weeks. Last month, the bank lowered its key interest rate to 4.7 per cent, marking its first rate cut since March 2020.

Stay Connected